Resource Directory

Health Care Cost Calculator

Check out Get Covered’s calculator to learn your estimated monthly health insurance cost. While not every plan option and tax credit can be estimated here, this will help you be ready to get enrolled.

Health Law Answers

AARP 

Learn how the Affordable Care Act will work for you and your family.

MNsure

Uninsured? Barely covered? Go to MNsure.org to browse plans, qualify for tax credits, free, or low cost plans, and enroll in coverage.

More resources in Health

Health Care Cost Calculator

Check out Get Covered’s calculator to learn your estimated monthly health insurance cost. While not every plan option and tax credit can be estimated here, this will help you be ready to get enrolled.

Health Law Answers

AARP 

Learn how the Affordable Care Act will work for you and your family.

MNsure

Uninsured? Barely covered? Go to MNsure.org to browse plans, qualify for tax credits, free, or low cost plans, and enroll in coverage.

More resources in Help Getting Health Care

Working Paper on Tax Reform Options

Citizens for Tax Justice, January 2013 

There are at least three major categories of tax reforms Congress could pursue to raise revenue. They include ending tax breaks and loopholes that allow wealthy individuals to shelter their investment income from taxation, ending breaks and loopholes that allow large, profitable corporations to shift their profits offshore to avoid U.S. taxes, and limiting the ability of wealthy individuals to use itemized deductions and exclusions to lower their taxes.

2005 Minnesota Corporate Income Tax Bulletin

Minnesota Department of Revenue, 2009 

This bulletin summarizes data from corporate income tax returns (Minnesota
Form M4) received by the Department of Revenue in calendar year 2005.

60 Percent of Women’s Job Gains in the Recovery Are in the 10 Largest Low-Wage Jobs

National Women’s Law Center, July 2013. 

Women have regained a large number of the jobs they lost during the recession, but their gains are highly concentrated in low-wage occupations. Sixty percent of the increase in employment for women between 2009 and 2012 was in the 10 largest occupations that typically pay less than $10.10 per hour (“the 10 largest low-wage occupations”). In contrast, these 10 low-wage occupations accounted for only 20 percent of men’s employment growth over the same period.

More resources in Work & Wealth

60 Percent of Women’s Job Gains in the Recovery Are in the 10 Largest Low-Wage Jobs

National Women’s Law Center, July 2013. 

Women have regained a large number of the jobs they lost during the recession, but their gains are highly concentrated in low-wage occupations. Sixty percent of the increase in employment for women between 2009 and 2012 was in the 10 largest occupations that typically pay less than $10.10 per hour (“the 10 largest low-wage occupations”). In contrast, these 10 low-wage occupations accounted for only 20 percent of men’s employment growth over the same period.

A Stealthy Stimulus: How boosting the minimum wage is helping support the economy

Kai Filion, Economic Policy Institute, Issue Brief #255, May 28, 2009

The recently enacted American Recovery and Reinvestment Act included policies to help struggling families and create jobs. But an extremely effective and simple policy that achieves both of these goals is often overlooked: increases in the minimum wage. Each increase provides financial relief directly to minimum wage workers and their families and helps to stimulate the economy. By increasing workers’ take-home pay, families gain both financial security and an increased ability to purchase goods and services, thus creating jobs for other Americans.

A Substantial Minimum Wage Hike for Minnesota: Benefits, Costs and Economic and Political Consequences

Ann Markusen, Jennifer Ebert, Martina Cameron, Project on Regional and Industrial Economics, The Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, September 2003

The minimum wage in Minnesota, once considered to be a living wage and enough to keep a worker out of poverty, has continually eroded in real terms since 1968, falling from $8.27 in real purchasing power to $5.15 today. In other states with comparable economies to ours, voters and/or the legislatures have raised their minimum wages to between $6.50 and $7.00, sometimes with built-in cost of living adjusters. In this brief, we profile the Minnesota individuals and regions that would benefit from a substantial increase in the minimum wage. We summarize what is known about the minimum wage and the impacts of an increase on workers, consumers, businesses, aggregate levels of employment, welfare, training and the state budget. We compare it to another highly acclaimed mechanism for improving the income distribution, the earned income tax credit.

More resources in Minimum Wage Campaign Materials

Working Paper on Tax Reform Options

Citizens for Tax Justice, January 2013 

There are at least three major categories of tax reforms Congress could pursue to raise revenue. They include ending tax breaks and loopholes that allow wealthy individuals to shelter their investment income from taxation, ending breaks and loopholes that allow large, profitable corporations to shift their profits offshore to avoid U.S. taxes, and limiting the ability of wealthy individuals to use itemized deductions and exclusions to lower their taxes.

2005 Minnesota Corporate Income Tax Bulletin

Minnesota Department of Revenue, 2009 

This bulletin summarizes data from corporate income tax returns (Minnesota
Form M4) received by the Department of Revenue in calendar year 2005.

Apple, Microsoft and Eight Other Corporations Each Increased Their Offshore Profit Holdings by $5 Billion or More in 2012

Citizens for Tax Justice, March 2013 

In recent years, multinational U.S.-based corporations have systematically accumulated
staggering amounts of profits offshore. Much if not most of these profits were actually earned in the United States but have been artificially shifted to foreign tax havens to avoid U.S. corporate income taxes. Taking a look at the 10 most aggressive corporations.

More resources in Taxes

Expanding Social Security: Adequate Benefits for the Lowest-Income Earners

Center for Community Change, May 2012 

Social Security provides vital income assistance for 1 in 5 Americans, with 36 million seniors receiving benefits as of April 2012. It keeps an estimated 13 million seniors out of poverty. (Source: CBPP) However, despite meaningful contributions to the system during their working lives, many seniors still receive very modest benefits. With rising health care and housing costs, retirees who were lifetime low-wage earners find it increasingly difficult to make ends meet especially because they do not have other sources of income such as pension funds or savings.

Expanding Social Security: Building an Educated Workforce by Restoring Social Security Benefits for College-Age Students

Center for Community Change, May 2012 

Education provides one of the best pathways to economic security and social mobility. Unfortunately, educational attainment remains a far-away dream for many young low and middle-income Americans, who face high levels of unemployment, falling household incomes, rising tuition bills, and the prospect of astronomical student debt. Restoring benefits for postsecondary students under Social Security is an important way to help ensure that vulnerable students can complete their education and take advantage of the lifelong benefits that postsecondary education provides.

Expanding Social Security: Caring for Those Who Care for Us

Center for Community Change, May 2012 

Caregiving is critical work and a fundamental part of our society. In our earliest years and in our final ones, we often depend on the care provided by a family member or friend. This care is a vital service to young children, the millions of ill and disabled individuals, and especially to the rapidly growing number of elderly Americans.

More resources in Retirement Security

Trans-Pacfic Partnership Fact Sheet

Citizens Trade Campaign, 2013

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a massive new international trade and investment pact being pushed by the U.S. government at the behest of transnational corporations.

More resources in Trans-Pacific Partnership

Inequality as Policy: The United States Since 1979

John Schmitt, Center for Economic and Policy Research, October 2009

Since the end of the 1970s, the United States has seen a dramatic increase in economic inequality. While the United States has long been among the most unequal of the world’s rich economies, the economic and social upheaval that began in the 1970s was a striking departure from the movement toward greater equality that began in the Great Depression, continued through World War II, and was a central feature of the first 30 years of the postwar period.

Despite the magnitude of the rise in inequality, the political discourse in the United States refers only obliquely to these developments. The public debate generally acknowledges neither the scale of the increase in inequality nor, except in the most superficial way, the causes of this sudden and sustained turn of events.

This short essay seeks to provide an alternative view of the postwar period in the United States, particularly of the last three decades. My argument is that the high and rising inequality in the United States is the direct result of a set of policies designed first and foremost to increase inequality. These policies, in turn, have their roots in a significant shift in political power against workers and in favor of their employers, a shift that began in the 1970s and continues through today.

SNAP Benefits Will Be Cut for All Participants In November 2013

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, August 2013 

The 2009 Recovery Act’s temporary boost to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits is scheduled to end on November 1, 2013, resulting in a benefit cut for every SNAP household. For families of three, the cut will be $29 a month — a total of $319 for November 2013 through September 2014, the remaining months of fiscal year 2014.

That’s a serious loss, especially in light of the very low amount of basic SNAP benefits. Without the Recovery Act’s boost, SNAP benefits will average less than $1.40 per person per meal in 2014. Nationally, the total cut is estimated to be $5 billion in fiscal year 2014.

The future of work: Trends and challenges for low-wage workers

Rebecca Thiess, Economic Policy Institute, April 27, 2012

Many workers are facing uniquely tough times. Though now below its recessionary peak of 10 percent in October 2009, unemployment remains high at 8.2 percent, and job growth is slow. With around 25 million people unemployed or underemployed, it is clear that the jobs crisis did not subside with the official end of the recession. Moreover, workers are still suffering from difficulties that materialized in the decades before the Great Recession, such as deteriorating job quality and stagnant wages. The economic expansion from 2001–2007, for instance, was among the weakest on record; typical family incomes grew by less than one half of one percent between 2000 and 2007 (Bivens 2011). These economic challenges are particularly acute for workers at the bottom of the wage scale.

This paper focuses on low-wage workers—who they are, where they work, where they live, and what their future challenges may be in regards to education/skill requirements, job quality, and wages. Analysis of employment projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reveals that the future of work will be shaped by much more than labor market skill demands. And in the future, rising wages will depend more on the wage growth within occupations than on any change in the mix of occupations.

More resources in Future of Work

Call Center Bill

H.R. 2909

To require the Secretary of Labor to maintain a publicly available list of all employers that relocate a call center overseas, to make such companies ineligible for Federal grants or guaranteed loans, and to require disclosure of the physical location of business agents engaging in customer service communications, and for other purposes.

More resources in Call Center Bill

State Recidivism: The Revolving Door of America’s Prisons

Pew Center on the States, April 2011 

The dramatic growth of America’s prison population during the past three decades
is by now a familiar story. This report compares recidivism rates among states, and shows that Minnesota has the worst rate in the nation at 61%.

More resources in Criminal Justice Reform

Basic Organizing Conversation

Guidelines for how to have a one-to-one conversation, a key foundation of community organizing, and make powerful invitations to bring other people into action with you.

Call Center Bill

H.R. 2909

To require the Secretary of Labor to maintain a publicly available list of all employers that relocate a call center overseas, to make such companies ineligible for Federal grants or guaranteed loans, and to require disclosure of the physical location of business agents engaging in customer service communications, and for other purposes.

CWA Local Political Action Team

CWA Minnesota

To reclaim our democracy and build an economy that works for us all, we need to replace big money politics with people politics. LPATs are the committees within CWA locals that are built to do just that—build people power at the grassroots and use that power to advance an agenda of social, racial, and economic justice.

More resources in CWA

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